Part 3: Adding Basic Authentication to Asp.Net Core the right way

This blog is all about adding Basic Authentication to Asp.Net Core.

Warning: Although implementing Basic Authentication seems easy, it brings a vulnerability to your site! names and passwords provided are sent over the internet unencrypted. This means: the authentication method does not hide the name and password for hackers. You have to encrypt the communication yourself! Therefore, always combine Basic Authentication with SSL, also known as HTTPS.

In the past, I have written my own simple Basic Authentication NuGet package. It’s still ok for simple classic Asp.Net MVC projects.

But I want to use Basic Authentication In Asp.Net Core. Instead of (re)writing my own NuGet package, I checked out the NuGet store and found a nice solution.

This NuGet package provides me the flexibility to add Basic Authentication to my (test) projects.

In this blog, we will see what we have to do to get it running. And we will see how we can beef up the security by using HTTPS.

Continue reading “Part 3: Adding Basic Authentication to Asp.Net Core the right way”

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Part 2: Passing data from outside an Asp.Net MVC Core site to the browser using SignalR

In my last blog, I show how you can implement SignalR on a website running Asp.Net MVC Core. Although the libraries are still in Alpha, the functionality looks very promising.

In this blog, I will show you how you can pass data on to the website so it can be shown in the browser. Users will ‘instantly’ see updates coming on the website.

Let’s check this out.

Continue reading “Part 2: Passing data from outside an Asp.Net MVC Core site to the browser using SignalR”

Part 1: Getting SignalR running on Asp.Net MVC Core

Microsoft has a very powerful implementation of WebSockets available named SignalR. Personally, I like the fact it automatically scales down if needed to other communication solutions if WebSockets is not working (like long polling).

I used it in the past several times for dashboards but in my current project, I had a new challenge. We are using Asp.Net MVC Core. This is ‘the latest’ flavor of Asp.Net and our websites can now run on both Windows and Linux.

But Asp.Net MVC Core has broken with the past, which is a good thing but it also needs a different way to activate SignalR.

Microsoft has provided documentation but it was written towards the standard, non-MVC applications.

It took me a while to get SignalR running.

But first, let me introduce you to the steps to be taken to get SignalR running on Asp.Net MVC Core. Continue reading “Part 1: Getting SignalR running on Asp.Net MVC Core”

How to build a simple IoT Edge Version 2 Heartbeat Module

Recently, the Microsoft Azure IoT Edge platform was updated with more features, better documentation and lots of goodies. Version two is brand new and still in Public Preview. The new features and fixes are both very welcome and promising.

Yes, the learning curve of this new version is steep, especially if you are new (like me) to Docker. But once you have started building your own Edge solution, things seem to fall into place quite well.

A logical flow, on learning this new platform, seems to be described in the Microsoft documentation:

  1. Simulate an IoT Edge device in Windows
  2. Simulate an IoT Edge device in Linux
  3. Develop and deploy a C# module
  4. Deploy Azure Stream Analytics as a module
  5. Deploy Azure Machine Learning as a module
  6. Deploy Azure Functions as a module

Looks easy, doesn’t it?

But by reading the comments on the different pages, it seems people are still confused.

The biggest tip is: DO NOT MIX VERSION ONE AND VERSION TWO DOCUMENTATION.

Version one is/was based on one executable (gw.exe) which injects classes from DLL’s (a configuration file has to be supplied). Modules are just classes in the DLL’s.

Version two is based on Docker Containers, each module is a separate container and therefore each module is a separate executable. These modules share the same logic on how to connect to a shared message bus which provides the routing of messages between the modules. This ‘runtime’ has to be installed on the Edge machine, next to/outside the Docker containers.

Note: the good thing is that the architecture still stands, multiple modules on top of a message bus and messages are routed. The best thing is that the new routing solution is far more intelligent, different messages are separated from each other. And Microsoft has provided some guidance for migration for your ‘old’ modules.

So work your way through the documentation provided above. After that, check out my recent blogs:

OK, I know, the learning curve is still steep.

How about if I add an example of a simple but functional module?

Continue reading “How to build a simple IoT Edge Version 2 Heartbeat Module”

Deploy an Azure StreamAnalytics Job on the IoTEdge

[Update 15-01-2018]: The issue is being fixed asap. I have been notified the dialogs of Azure Stream Analytics will be changed in a couple of days. This blog will remain valid, though.

[Update 13-01-2018]: It seems the IoTEdge-ASA integration is suddenly not available in the Azure Portal. Eg. the Environment Host question shown below is dropped and no Edge Hub input or output is selectable anymore. No idea why… When more information is available, a new update will be posted here.

The second version of the Microsoft IoTEdge solution is now available as Public Preview. In this version, you can run predefined modules like Modbusbuild your own modules, deploy Azure Machine Learning modules, deploy Azure Functions and you can deploy Azure StreamAnalytics jobs.

The concept is pretty simple, as always you have to create an ASA job, define inputs, outputs and a query. But this time the ASA will run on a local device:

Microsoft provides documentation here and here explaining how to deploy your ASA modules. Let’s dig a bit deeper into it. Continue reading “Deploy an Azure StreamAnalytics Job on the IoTEdge”

Introduction to the microsoft/azureiotedge-modbus-tcp IoTEdge Module

The newest version of the Azure IoTEdge solution is a very promising platform. The combination of remote provisioning the modules, the power of twin configuration and the new routing is interesting. But the learning curve is pretty steep.

The first version was based on programming an application. The new version is based on docker images, each being a separate application, which has to be stored in the container registry of your choice (like Docker Hub or your own container registry in Azure.

So once you have learned how to build and deploy your own modules, you can check out the modules Microsoft already supplies.

One of these modules is a Modbus module. It’s available at the Docker Hub of Microsoft. Modbus is a great protocol for highspeed communication over TCP and I have already blogged about it, using the previous IoTEdge SDK version.

Let’s check out how we get some telemetry from it.

Continue reading “Introduction to the microsoft/azureiotedge-modbus-tcp IoTEdge Module”

Better property roundtrip for Azure IoTEdge Module Twins

The newest version of the Azure IoT Edge is still in public preview but this one makes the Edge truly intelligent!

We are now able to both distribute and manage logic on-premise.

Version one of the IoT Edge was and still is based on running an executable. And each module (ingest, transform, distribute) is a class in a dynamic library. And all modules are connected using a broker serving the role as MessageBus. Messages between modules are exchanged using configurable routes.

This first version is still available for download. But the new version is fundamentally different.

Modules hosted as a container

In the new version, we still see modules connected by and exchanging messages using a local MessageBus. But Microsoft has redefined the modules into separate executables, each running is a different container. The containers are hosted in Docker and can run on Linux or Windows.

Microsoft already provided a lot of modules in the Docker Hub, for OPC UA support, for Modbus support, etc. And you can deploy your own modules too!

There are multiple examples available on the Microsoft website which explain how to get started.

In this blog, I show how tweaking some example code leads to even better management and a better understanding of what’s happening on the Edge using the Module Twins properties.

Continue reading “Better property roundtrip for Azure IoTEdge Module Twins”